Tag: Podcast

6 Big Social Media Marketing Mistakes B2B’s Make – Best SEO Podcast 339

2016-09-16 Podcast 339 Chris: Hi and welcome to the SEO Podcast UnknownSecrets of Internet Marketing.

My name is Chris Burres, owner of eWebResults.

Chuck: I am Charles Lewis, your Client ResultsAdvocate.

Chris: Welcome back to another fun-fillededition of our podcast, this is podcast number — Chris & Chuck: 339.

Chris: Thank you so much for tuning in.

As always I should’ve been a little moreprepared for this, because now my Apple– Chuck: Yeah, as always we have a tip fromour– Chris & Chuck: Last podcast and that tip is– Chuck: There you go.

Chris: Block staging sites from being indexed.

Chuck: Any time you’re building a new siteyou want to build the production site first so you can work on it.

The key is to block it from being indexedby Google, Yahoo and Bing so that way you don’t have any production links actuallyshowing up in Google search results.

Chris: Please remember we are filmed livehere in Houston, Texas and Charles and I we’re your friendly local neighborhood– Chris & Chuck: Top Position Snatchers! Chris: And our mantra is: Chuck: Do not be a douche! Chris: Do not be a douche.

We’ve got a good article today.

Chuck: We’ve got a great article today,want to give a huge punch in the face to Tamara, Tamara Weintraub, she posted this articleover on Search Engine Journal, “6 Huge B2B Social Media Marketing Mistakes to Avoid”.

Chris: 6 huge.

Chuck: 6 huge– Chris: B2B! Chuck: Business to business– Chris: Right.

Chuck: Social media marketing mistakes toavoid.

We’re diving into that today.

Chris: I think that’s good.

You will notice on this side, under– righton my cheek, under my right eye, there is a tear tattoo.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: I heard the tattoo gun going off Iwas like man, it’ll to be one of them weekends.

Chris: I think he turned it on extra hightoo, I don’t know.

It was just like, I haven’t seen you ina while, this one’s going to hurt! So, the way that works is that I get a teartattoo every time we don’t get a review and we did not get a review this time so,it’s a sad day.

Chuck: It also means we have to give someinstructions about how to leave us a review.

Chris: So yeah, and I was thinking, and weeven talked about last time that it had been so long.

I wrote notes, I was like hmm, I may haveto do this, I don’t remember how to do this.

So, we will tell you how to leave us a review,there are three kind of main ways to leave a review.

One of those ways has three steps.

Chuck: Yup.

Chris: Get onto iTunes, create an account– Chris & Chuck: Write a review.

Chris: And hopefully you’ll make that review– Chris & Chuck: 5 stars! Chris: The next way is to go on to Stitcher.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: It’s actually really easy to getto Stitcher, just go to eWebResults.

Com, I think you slide down on the homepage.

Chuck: Yeah, you’ll see iTunes logo, you’llsee Stitcher logo.

Click Stitcher logo, that’ll take you toour Stitcher page and from there you can click to write a review button.

Chris: Yup, right there and then finally we’vegot G+, now you know we’re Google Local Business, Google my Business– Chuck: Google my Business, Google Places,Google Local, yeah all of the above.

Chris: And it can be really hard to describehow to get there, we’ve made it really easy.

All you need to do is go to eWebResults.

Com/– Chuck: Google+ Chris: or /– Chuck: Googleplus Chris: or /– Chuck: G+ Chris: or /– Chuck: Gplus Chris: All of those literally will take youright to a pop-up, assuming workstation.

Chuck: I know.

Chris: A pop-up that says hey, you know whereyou can write a review right there.

Chuck: Write a review, yup.

Chris: So, that is how you like– leave usa review.

We are running a contest, if we get 10 shikos,which are– Chuck: Shikos are our– eWebResults’ brandedterm for social engagements.

That’s for shares, likes and follows, shikos.

Chris: If we get 10 of those and a reviewthen we skip that section we just did, so– Chuck: Yeah, so leave us a review.

Chris: Moves us to help you to figure outwhere to shiko us and you can do that at all sorts of places, and there would be like Facebook.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: YouTube.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: Twitter.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: Instagram.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: and LinkedIn.

Com/company/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: You thought that was going to lastforever, didn’t you? Slaaaash.

If you are a PHP genius or a WordPress guruwe’re probably looking for you.

Chuck: For you.

Chris: Call us and leave an audio résumé.

Chuck: They call us, they’ve been tweetingus.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Just so you know.

Chris: Oh, have they? Chuck: Yeah, all kind of WordPress peopleand p– and they’ve all been tweeting us, but follow instructions.

Call the number.

Chris: Yeah.

Part of our problem is we have a process foreverything which makes us successful for our clients and part of the process is if youwant to join the team, call us 713-510-7846.

Leave an audio résumé, we do provide freecomprehensive website analysis for people– Chuck: Yeah, keyword comprehensive, yeah.

Chris: Comprehensive, yeah that is literallykeyword.

It’s a 13 page comprehensive report.

You start with a 20 to 30 minute phone calland, yeah.

It’s good.

All you need to do is go to eWebResults.

Com,you’ll see the green button.

Chuck: Yeah, it says Free Website Analysis,click that and give us your name, email and your web address obviously, and– Chris: And phone number if you’re out ofthe country or usually connect on a Google Hangout or Skype or something, figure outsome schedule that works with me.

And we do have Algo Cat, right? Chuck: No.

Chris: We do not have– I should’ve puttwo tears actually.

Chuck: Yeah, there was no Algo Cat and theonly reason we don’t have Algo Cat– Chris: It’s because it was close, huh? Chuck: It was really close and according tothe experts over at Search Engine Journal and Search Engine Land– Chris: Right.

Chuck: There was algorithmic activity overthe weekend, this– [00:05:15] [Indiscernible] during this week, except the guy Garry Illyesfrom Google just tweeted out, he said “Nothing major, guys just working”.

That was his response to a whole bunch ofrequests to hey what happened? What happened? What happened? Chris: Like what’s going on? What’s going on? Did you do something? Yeah.

Nothing major, it’s a tremor yeah.

Chuck: Yeah, sure.

Chris: Which they didn’t share so we really– Chuck: We don’t know.

Chris: We could’ve said Algorithm Cataclysmand go, stuff changed.

And in other news.

Chuck: Exactly, and you know, we don’t knowwhat stuff that was.

Chris: Yeah, just stuff.

Stuff changed.

You got some PITFs? Chuck: Yeah I do got some PITFs.

Man, this PITF– Chris: Punch in the face.

Chuck: This PITF goes to Derick Hildebrandt.

Chris: Hildebrandt.

Chuck: Hildebrandt, Derick Hildebrandt.

Hehit us up at Twitter he’s @DerickHilde.

He says “@eWebResults Just started listeningto your podcast and I love it! Like halfway through I realized you were alsothe SEO rapper!” Chris: Oh wow cool! Chuck: So I retweeted him, punch in the faceto you Derick, man.

Chris: That’s awesome.

Chuck: Appreciate you tuning in, and yes,I am that guy.

Chris: So we don’t mention that very oftenso that’s pretty cool.

Chuck: That’s what I told him, stay tuned,man.

We’ve got a new video shoot coming at theend of this month, hey it’s going to be nuts.

Chris: Awesome.

Chuck: You got to stay tuned for that one.

I also got one, you ever heard of Hey.

Com Chris: Hey? 2016-09-16 Podcast 339 Chris: Hi and welcome to the SEO Podcast UnknownSecrets of Internet Marketing.

My name is Chris Burres, owner of eWebResults.

Chuck: I am Charles Lewis, your Client ResultsAdvocate.

Chris: Welcome back to another fun-fillededition of our podcast, this is podcast number — Chris & Chuck: 339.

Chris: Thank you so much for tuning in.

Asalways I should’ve been a little more prepared for this, because now my Apple– Chuck: Yeah, as always we have a tip fromour– Chris & Chuck: Last podcast and that tip is– Chuck: There you go.

Chris: Block staging sites from being indexed.

Chuck: Any time you’re building a new siteyou want to build the production site first so you can work on it.

The key is to blockit from being indexed by Google, Yahoo and Bing so that way you don’t have any productionlinks actually showing up in Google search results.

Chris: Please remember we are filmed livehere in Houston, Texas and Charles and I we’re your friendly local neighborhood– Chris & Chuck: Top Position Snatchers! Chris: And our mantra is: Chuck: Do not be a douche! Chris: Do not be a douche.

We’ve got a goodarticle today.

Chuck: We’ve got a great article today,want to give a huge punch in the face to Tamara, Tamara Weintraub, she posted this articleover on Search Engine Journal, “6 Huge B2B Social Media Marketing Mistakes to Avoid”.

Chris: 6 huge.

Chuck: 6 huge– Chris: B2B! Chuck: Business to business– Chris: Right.

Chuck: Social media marketing mistakes toavoid.

We’re diving into that today.

Chris: I think that’s good.

You will noticeon this side, under– right on my cheek, under my right eye, there is a tear tattoo.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: I heard the tattoo gun going off Iwas like man, it’ll to be one of them weekends.

Chris: I think he turned it on extra hightoo, I don’t know.

It was just like, I haven’t seen you in a while, this one’s going tohurt! So, the way that works is that I get a tear tattoo every time we don’t get areview and we did not get a review this time so, it’s a sad day.

Chuck: It also means we have to give someinstructions about how to leave us a review.

Chris: So yeah, and I was thinking, and weeven talked about last time that it had been so long.

I wrote notes, I was like hmm, Imay have to do this, I don’t remember how to do this.

So, we will tell you how to leaveus a review, there are three kind of main ways to leave a review.

One of those wayshas three steps.

Chuck: Yup.

Chris: Get onto iTunes, create an account– Chris & Chuck: Write a review.

Chris: And hopefully you’ll make that review– Chris & Chuck: 5 stars! Chris: The next way is to go on to Stitcher.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: It’s actually really easy to getto Stitcher, just go to eWebResults.

Com, I think you slide down on the homepage.

Chuck: Yeah, you’ll see iTunes logo, you’llsee Stitcher logo.

Click Stitcher logo, that’ll take you to our Stitcher page and from thereyou can click to write a review button.

Chris: Yup, right there and then finally we’vegot G+, now you know we’re Google Local Business, Google my Business– Chuck: Google my Business, Google Places,Google Local, yeah all of the above.

Chris: And it can be really hard to describehow to get there, we’ve made it really easy.

All you need to do is go to eWebResults.

Com/– Chuck: Google+ Chris: or /– Chuck: Googleplus Chris: or /– Chuck: G+ Chris: or /– Chuck: Gplus Chris: All of those literally will take youright to a pop-up, assuming workstation.

Chuck: I know.

Chris: A pop-up that says hey, you know whereyou can write a review right there.

Chuck: Write a review, yup.

Chris: So, that is how you like– leave usa review.

We are running a contest, if we get 10 shikos, which are– Chuck: Shikos are our– eWebResults’ brandedterm for social engagements.

That’s for shares, likes and follows, shikos.

Chris: If we get 10 of those and a reviewthen we skip that section we just did, so– Chuck: Yeah, so leave us a review.

Chris: Moves us to help you to figure outwhere to shiko us and you can do that at all sorts of places, and there would be like Facebook.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: YouTube.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: Twitter.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: Instagram.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: and LinkedIn.

Com/company/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: You thought that was going to lastforever, didn’t you? Slaaaash.

If you are a PHP genius or a WordPress guru we’re probablylooking for you.

Chuck: For you.

Chris: Call us and leave an audio résumé.

Chuck: They call us, they’ve been tweetingus.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Just so you know.

Chris: Oh, have they? Chuck: Yeah, all kind of WordPress peopleand p– and they’ve all been tweeting us, but follow instructions.

Call the number.

Chris: Yeah.

Part of our problem is we havea process for everything which makes us successful for our clients and part of the process isif you want to join the team, call us 713-510-7846.

Leave an audio résumé, we do provide freecomprehensive website analysis for people– Chuck: Yeah, keyword comprehensive, yeah.

Chris: Comprehensive, yeah that is literallykeyword.

It’s a 13 page comprehensive report.

You start with a 20 to 30 minute phone calland, yeah.

It’s good.

All you need to do is go to eWebResults.

Com, you’ll see thegreen button.

Chuck: Yeah, it says Free Website Analysis,click that and give us your name, email and your web address obviously, and– Chris: And phone number if you’re out ofthe country or usually connect on a Google Hangout or Skype or something, figure outsome schedule that works with me.

And we do have Algo Cat, right? Chuck: No.

Chris: We do not have– I should’ve puttwo tears actually.

Chuck: Yeah, there was no Algo Cat and theonly reason we don’t have Algo Cat– Chris: It’s because it was close, huh? Chuck: It was really close and according tothe experts over at Search Engine Journal and Search Engine Land– Chris: Right.

Chuck: There was algorithmic activity overthe weekend, this– [00:05:15] [Indiscernible] during this week, except the guy Garry Illyesfrom Google just tweeted out, he said “Nothing major, guys just working”.

That was hisresponse to a whole bunch of requests to hey what happened? What happened? What happened? Chris: Like what’s going on? What’s goingon? Did you do something? Yeah.

Nothing major, it’s a tremor yeah.

Chuck: Yeah, sure.

Chris: Which they didn’t share so we really– Chuck: We don’t know.

Chris: We could’ve said Algorithm Cataclysmand go, stuff changed.

And in other news.

Chuck: Exactly, and you know, we don’t knowwhat stuff that was.

Chris: Yeah, just stuff.

Stuff changed.

Yougot some PITFs? Chuck: Yeah I do got some PITFs.

Man, thisPITF– Chris: Punch in the face.

Chuck: This PITF goes to Derick Hildebrandt.

Chris: Hildebrandt.

Chuck: Hildebrandt, Derick Hildebrandt.

Hehit us up at Twitter he’s @DerickHilde.

He says “@eWebResults Just started listeningto your podcast and I love it! Like halfway through I realized you were also the SEO rapper!” Chris: Oh wow cool! Chuck: So I retweeted him, punch in the faceto you Derick, man.

Chris: That’s awesome.

Chuck: Appreciate you tuning in, and yes,I am that guy.

Chris: So we don’t mention that very oftenso that’s pretty cool.

Chuck: That’s what I told him, stay tuned,man.

We’ve got a new video shoot coming at the end of this month, hey it’s goingto be nuts.

Chris: Awesome.

Chuck: You got to stay tuned for that one.

I also got one, you ever heard of Hey.

Com Chris: Hey? Chuck: Like H E Y, like heeey.

Chris: No.

Chuck: So, Hey.

Com released their top 20 listof marketing podcast.

Chris: Oh! I think you said that, you didsay that, so.

Chuck: Yeah, and so I want to give a punchin the face to them, they say, they’re @heycom1, they said “The @eWebResults #SEO #Podcastw Chris Burres & @Chuck Charles Lewis on 2016 Top 20 #Marketing Podcasts List”.

Appreciatey’all including us and tweeting it and thank you so much.

Chris: Yeah, you know what’s interestingbecause you’re going to want to– Chuck: I’ll take top 20.

Chris: Absolutely, well one of the thingswe say is we’re the most popular and so I’m looking through it, so anytime I seea list I want to like, okay and some of them we say most popular SEO and internet marketing,half the people on the list were other things, like– Chris & Chuck: email marketing– Chris: Specifically, or social m– Facebookspecifically, Facebook.

Pay-per-click marketing.

I mean, that’s a narrow, tiny niche of whatwe kind of cover, so I felt good reading the list.

1) Because we’re on it and 2) because– Chuck: We cover a lot of all of those things,so.

Chris: Yeah, we’re still the most popularSEO podcast on iTunes, so that’s good.

Chuck: Yeah.

That’s what’s up.

Then, that’smy PITFS.

Chris: Excellent, I’ve got a little bitof news, one of them is wonky, I just love this kind of weird stuff where Google actuallyblurred out the face of a cow on Google Street.

Chuck: Oh, just because of face recognition? Chris: Because it was a face! Chuck: Probably that technology.

Chris: Privacy protection.

Chuck: Wait hold on, that is a nose.

Chris: That’s it, that’s an eye– Chuck: That’s a mighty weird looking person,but blurred.

Chris: Blur it out, yeah.

That’s the ugliestperson I have ever seen, but no.

Blur it out.

Chuck: Blur it.

Chris: I thought that was funny.

London couldcrack down or be the next city to crack down on Airbnb.

I had never thought of this, likewhy do you think London or a city might crack down on Airbnb? Chuck: Because they don’t have opportunityto tax it.

Chris: Right, so– right no– that’s– Chuck: Any time they can’t get paid they’vegot to stop this.

Chris: They’ve got to stop it.

And hotels,you know– Chuck: Of course, everybody– It’s the samereason yellow cabs complain about Uber, right? Chris: Yup.

So listen to this, this I hadnever thought of.

Or heard of.

They’re worried that investors are buying properties in downtownLondon so they can run Airbnbs versus you know, driving a property profit.

Chuck: Versus– Why not? It’s going on inHouston right now in front of everybody for the Super Bowl.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Right, like everybody’s– Airbnbis the buzz in Houston right now.

Chris: So, if you buy properties and you onlyneed to rent them out a short number of period of time then you end up raising the priceand so people can’t live there, so I had just never heard that before.

Chuck: I get it, like hey.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: That’s part of, part of capitalism.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: That’s how it works, that’s calleda loophole, you know.

Oh no wait, you know, I can do this and there’s no legislationpreventing me from doing this thing, it’s legal.

Chris: I can make money and they can’t stopme.

Yup.

Chuck: Well, not yet, they’re going to haveto research it or pass some legislation and vote.

And do all kinds of other stuff beforethat happens.

Chris: Exactly.

In London the rule is thatyou’re welcome to rent out short term, you can only do 90 days a year and like, so howdo we enforce that.

We’ve got to keep track of which residents have rented out a roomfor which number of days and then stop them at 91? It’s either all or nothing to enforcethat.

So, very interesting.

Chuck: Interesting.

Chris: Pokemon Go, their accessory eitherjust came out or is about to come out.

Have you ever played Pokemon Go? Chuck: Nope.

Chris: Okay.

So apparently– Chuck: I have no intentions to.

Chris: Me either.

Apparently– but it’scool.

Chuck: I saw somebody playing it recentlytoo, I was like– I almost tripped them.

When I realized, yeah when I realized that’swhat he was doing, he was looking at his phone, he walked right by, Ah you looking for Pokemon.

Chris: Pfff, there’s one! Chuck: Yeah, so Poke-trip.

Chris: Yeah, it goes back to my– goes backto my– You’re not a real pokeman– Pokemon Go player unless you’ve been injured.

Chuck: Yeah, you have to get hurt first.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: It means you’re serious Chris: Let me help you.

Trip.

So, apparentlywhen you’re playing the game if the game’s not open, so maybe you’re checking emailor voice mail or whatever, your steps don’t count.

So you have to have the game open.

Chuck: You have to have– you can’t justbe active but not actually open the live screen.

Chris: [00:10:28] [Indiscernible: an issue?]Unless you buyby the $35 device which is a step counter, so now you don’t have to haveto have the app active–c– Chuck: So I can be on email on one time andI got my device going.

Chris: Oh yeah, tons of walking around, yeah.

Chuck: Let’s go Pokemon.

Chris: Isn’t that interesting? Chuck: Yes it is.

Chris: I think that was good.

And then yousent me a video, I thought it was really cool of being able to ride in an Uber– Chuck: In Pittsburgh.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: It’s testing right now, I thoughtthat was really really cool.

Chris: That was a cool video too, yeah.

Chuck: I got some more news too.

So let’sget into some Google news, some more marketing related news.

So now for all my agencies andpeople who frequent Google Analytics like me.

Chris: Yeah, all day everyday.

Chuck: And lets say you have multiple accountsand analytics you’re looking at.

Well, now you can move a Google Analytics property betweenaccounts.

So with the property moving you can consolidate multiple properties into theindividual account, which makes the most sense for them to belong to, right? And then consolidatingthese properties offers the following benefits, like the same set of filters across all yourproperties.

Right, so if you’re filtering all spam and bots and ghost and things likethat, you want to filter all of those out across the board.

You want to do that.

Thenalso, you can easily manage users for those properties, so let’s say you outsourcingsomething, or maybe you need to give access to several properties to one user, you cando that instead of having to do each property individually.

And lastly, you can use thechange history to see all of the events from all of the properties under one account, sothis is just a really cool upgrade for especially people like us with an agency where we’reusing you know, you log into my Analytics it’s probably like 60 accounts.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: You know what I saying? And so, halfof those are marketing somewhere, just website only, some are just Pay-per-click, right?And so if I could group these, which now I can, I can look at some stats and some data– Chris & Chuck: across the board– Chuck: a lot faster and a lot easier.

Chris: Well, and also the combining filters,right? Because– Chuck: Because everybody needs a filter regardlessof what property you are.

Chris: So when you add X Y Z URL to a filterbecause it’s a spam filter, ghost filter or whatever, I mean it goes visit then you’vegot to back into each account and add that same URL that’s a pain, yeah.

Chuck: Sucks, exactly.

There’s some moreGoogle news.

Paid ads.

So Google extends the deadline for expanded text ads, remember theexpanded text ads? Chris: Yeah, yeah.

Chuck: So if you’re using Google Adwordsright now they have these standard ad text and right now you can still create new standardads, you can even edit those ads.

That was going to expire in October, Google pushedit out to January 31st and at the end of January 31st you won’t be able to create standardtext ads anymore and the ones you do have, they’ll still be published but you can’tedit them.

You’ll only be able to pause and/or delete them.

Chris: Nice and simple.

Chuck: I get it.

Expanded text ads are theway to go, they’re bigger, they have more characters, you get an extra line of space,you get more information that’s easier to control your marketing verbiage and you’renot forced to use, you know 25, 35, 35.

Like you kind of were used to with the standardtext ads so I’m all for it.

So this almost could’ve been Algo Cat.

Chris: Close.

Chuck: Trip planning.

Chris: Okay.

Chuck: You ever planned a trip? What do youdo when you plan a trip? First thing most people do is probably search the area.

Chris: Search for– so well I search for–my last two searches for a trip, I ended up– one of them I ended up buying the hotel directlyfrom Google, right? And then the most recent one I started my search on Google and startedwith dates and airports.

Chuck: You started with the location? Chris: I started with airport, I think I saidflights from Houston to Vegas bla bla bla.

Chuck: So dig this, trip planning is comingto Google Maps on desktops only right now and it works by first entering a location– Chris: Oh, you’re talking about driving? Chuck: No.

Chris: Oh.

Chuck: Trip planning.

Exactly what you did.

Chris: Okay yeah, the whole thing, yeah.

Chuck: So it first starts by entering a locationsuch as a continent, a city or state that you’re thinking about visiting.

So you putin Houston, right? Chris: Right.

Chuck: And then search.

In the Google KnowledgeGraph you’re going to get an option that says plan a trip.

Chris: Wow.

Chuck: And when you click it, you’re goingto see information about the weather, flight duration, coming events.

Chris: It’s hot.

Chuck: Yeah, it’s hot.

This is what’sgoing on, this is whats not going on, who’s coming to town.

Awesome feature.

Chris: That’s cool.

Chuck: Sucks for people like Travelocity andOrbitz and these guys here because these old same guys are who would be in those searchresults for the search you did.

Chris: Exactly.

Chuck: But if Google’s giving you that informationdirectly in the Knowledge Gra– Chris: In Knowledge Graph, yeah.

And that’swhy I went there right, because Expedia’s right under it, Kayak’s right under it andI ended up going back to those just to spot check and then openly bought directly on theairline.

Chuck: And so, here’s the last one, thisis some Facebook news.

Businesses can now sell in Facebook Messenger.

Chris: Oh wow.

Chuck: Yeah, so you know Facebook Messengerhas already been releasing all kinds of little bots which where a kind of addons that asa business with a verified page you could add to your Messenger account.

Bots like allowingpeople to sign up through your email just through Messenger, or bots that allow peopleto, you know, do other stuff and engage with your company through Messenger.

Well, they’veadded a new bot and now shoppers can now buy products or services without leaving FacebookMessenger.

Chris: Wow.

Chuck: So, you put a product in there andI’m a verified page, we can send you a Buy It Now button and if you tap that you willpay us.

I can dig it.

That’s what’s up Facebook.

That’s my news.

Chris: That’s pretty cool.

Normally at thispart of the show I would read a review and not have this tattoo of a tear under my eye.

Since we don’t have a review that wraps up the potatoes portion of our podcast, it’stime to get into the meat.

Chuck: And so today’s meat comes from TamaraWeintraub and she posted this article on Search Engine Journal of “6 Huge B2B Social MediaMarketing Mistakes to Avoid”.

Right, and these are not just mistakes that people makethese are mistakes you really want to avoid.

She starts the article off by saying “whatif your product or service is something with a long sales cycle rather than a sought-afterconsumer product, or if your target audience is composed of IT managers or CFOs ratherthan moms or college students? You can still reach key B2B stakeholders through socialmedia marketing.

” Great question Tamara and a lot of people I think don’t considerthe fact that the audience you’re going after may not be the typical social mediaaudience, but that doesn’t mean it still can’t be effective because most people theythink social, yeah, they think about moms and college students and Millennials and peoplelike that who may not necessarily fit a B2B mode.

But yeah, if you’re an IT company and you’reusing social media to promote your IT services, then yeah you’re looking to find the businessmanager, the IT person on that– at the company that you’re marketing to.

You’re not lookingto find the president, he’s not going to make that decision.

The VP is not going tomake that decision, it’s usually the IT person that– who you communicate with andso she did some different ways that you can find the right people who are doing the socialmedia marketing.

It’s crucial to understand who you’re targeting and why you’re targetingand what to do.

Matter of fact I said understand your target so you can use the right messaging,the right graphics and the right content and if you don't understand who your target isthen you can’t develop the right content.

So for example, you’re an IT company andyou’re going after you know, IT managers.

Then they’re going to be a little bit moretechnical, they’re going to understand a lot more of the industry jargon, they’llbe more specific in regards to what they’re looking for and then therefore you need to–it’s okay to use IT jargon and that type of language in your content and in your visualsbecause those people understand it.

If you were marketing to let’s say a higher levelperson who just may not understand CAT 5 and all of the things that come with doing IT,then that’s the wrong type of content to use.

You’ve got to understand who your audienceis when you’re creating that.

So she’s got six points, Number 1.

Chris: Number one! Chuck: She says, “Dedicating Resources tothe Wrong Platforms”, then this is a huge B2B social media marketing mistake.

Chris: Yup.

Chuck: The first one is “Dedicating Resourcesto the Wrong Platforms”.

She says, “It’s important, especially if your resources arelimited, that you’re focusing your social media efforts in places that will generatethe most return for your efforts”.

Chris: Quickly.

Chuck: Quickly.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Yeah and anything quickly with socialis usually not happening right, but quickly meaning most efficiently and consistentlydoing it.

And so– and she’s right, right? You have to identify which resources you’regoing to do especially if they’re limited.

That may be a small business a small outfit,right.

You don’t have that many people, then I’m going to suggest that you focuson one social platform and really focus on what you’re doing there or B) use an agency.

In a situation like this an agency kind of has some people dedicated, they have the resourcesthere, they have the kind of skill set in place and so you don’t have to pay for thatlearning curve, but the key is understanding which platform that your audience uses andmore importantly how they use it.

Chris: Right.

Chuck: Right, so it’s more than just identifyingthe platform but understanding how they use it because different demographics use differentplatforms differently.

Right, that Gen X is going to use Instagram totally different forma Baby Boomer– Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: who’s going to use Instagram totallydifferent from a Millennial.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Right, my Boomers don’t use the SnapchatStories type feature in Instagram, they have no idea what those circles at the top of theirnew Instagram looks like.

They just stall the update.

Meanwhile our Millennials probablynever swipe through feeds, they’re probably only using stories, right? Chris: Right.

Chuck: And so to understand how people areusing the platforms, so you can understand how you need to market with it.

Chris: I’m glad you know that because–That was like, in this grouping Boomers and Millennials, I am a Boomer.

Number two! Chuck: Number 2.

“Having a Narrow Definitionof Social Media Marketing”, right you kind of expand what you believe.

Chris: Interesting.

Chuck: She goes on to saying, “Many businessesthink social media marketing just means having a claimed and active business page on Facebook,Twitter, LinkedIn, and other social channels.

But this narrow view of social media– thisis a narrow view of social media marketing”, and it is, ladies and gentlemen.

I need youto open your minds to the possibilities of search– social media marketing, like there’smore than just claiming that profile and verifying it and now you’re there and with moderateactivity.

That’s so 2000, right.

Right now it’s about really engaging, it’s aboutputting out content that generates shikos, right? That generates shares, likes and– Chris: Follows.

Chuck: Follows and things like that.

And soI’d say open your mind to the possibilities of social media marketing like costumer serviceor contest or content promotion or link building and lead generation and all those other thingsthat you can do with social media marketing.

Chris: Yup.

Chuck: Take advantage, it’s not just postingwhat you’re doing for the day.

It’s not just posting the latest event.

It’s sharingyour content, It’s introducing people to your company, it’s highlighting the factthat I’ve been with eWebResults for six years now.

Chris: Six years?! Chuck: This mu– Chris: Six! Chuck: This is the exact type of stuff thatyou can do with social media that helps grow your brain it helps paint your company asan expert.

Take advantage, don’t– get off that narrow definition of what social mediamarketing really is.

Chris: You can do more with it.

Chuck: You can do more with it.

I mean, wehave– we got people like Pizza Hut creating the pizza emojis and allowing you to orderpizzas through Twitter by using the emoji.

Chris: Wow.

I didn’t know that, that’spretty awesome.

Chuck: Yeah, we’ve got the NFL using Thursdaynight football specifically broadcast through Periscope on Twitter.

Chris: Wow.

Chuck: Like these are people who don’t havea narrow definition of social media marketing.

Take advantage.

Chris: Three! Chuck: Number 3.

“Having a One-and-DoneContent Strategy”.

Yeah, that’s definitely a Huge B2B mistake, she says, “What do allsocial media platforms have in common? They’re content driven,” she says, “On Twitter,your content typically only lives for about 20 minutes; on Facebook, a few hours.

But,too often, businesses are struggling to create and share new content multiple times a dayon these sites.

” I agree, not entirely with your numbers only due to the algorithmic changesand the chronological changes that all of these social platforms made.

Chris: Right.

Chuck: Because I know for me, for example,if you post something and I get notified, like hey, Chris just posted this.

If I don’tshiko, if I don’t like it, share, or comment.

Every time I open my phone that’s the firstpost I see, you know what I’m saying? Chris: Okay.

Chuck: Yeah, it’s like, hey, Chris stillpost– You ain’t done nothing and then– Chris: Yeah– What it’s really saying isnormally you do something.

Chuck: Normally– Exactly, normally I do somethingwhen he posts.

Chris: You must have missed it.

Chuck: Yeah, and so that’s way more than20 minutes.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: And same thing with Twitter, and Instagramfor that matter.

They’re showing you now results on your feed based off of who you’veengaged with the most, how active they’ve been and the type of content that you’relikely to engage with.

With that being said, it’s still important to not have a One-and-Donecontent strategy.

You must post consistently, matter of fact I wrote down: constantly repurposeand redistribute your content.

Now, pro tip: If you’re going to do this,one of the challenges most people make is man, I have one article that’s called–you know what’s the article, “The 6 Huge B2B Social Media Marketing Mistakes to avoid”How would you repurpose this article? Chris: Right.

Chuck: Right.

She– several ways.

She couldtake– Chris: By the way, you’re welcome becausewe’re repurposing it right now.

Chuck: Yeah, we’re repurposing it rightnow.

You can syndicate it, right? Here’s another way, these 6 different headings willmake great tweets.

Chris: Oh yeah.

Chuck: Right, with a supporting link.

Rightyou could take the intro paragraph to each one of these sections and that’ll be a greatFacebook post with a supporting link back to the post.

Chris: Back, yeah.

Chuck: Right, so you end up with six differentposts on Twitter, six different posts on Facebook that you can put out there.

That’s 12 differentposts for the same article.

Chris: Right.

Boom.

Chuck: Don’t have a One-and-Done ContentStrategy, repurpose.

Chris: Repurp– we’ve told you as audience,listeners, how many times we repurpose this podcast.

Chuck: Yeah, I mean you’re getting it liveright now.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: You know– Chris: In two locations YouTube and Facebook.

Chuck: In two locations on Facebook and YouTubeand on our site technically because you can go to eWebResults.

Com/SEOpodcast and watchthe live YouTube feed there also.

Chris: Right on our site, yeah.

Chuck: Then we’ll have an audio transcriptcoming.

Chris: Well the opening freestyle rap is putout there.

We take pictures during the podcast and before the podcast, they get put out there.

Chuck: Then they’ll go out again later ina newsletter and in some social stuff.

Chris: In the blog post the audio is cut outand turned into an iTunes podcast.

iTunes.

Chuck: iTunes, SoundCloud and Stitcher.

Chris: Yup.

Then– Chuck: Wow.

Chris: Yeah, I mean it just keeps going.

Chuck: Yeah it’s– but man, I remember itused to be like five-three things we’re doing.

Now it’s probably like twelve.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Repurposing the same content.

Chris: All over the place.

Number four! Chuck: Number 4.

“Avoiding New Content Formats(like Video)”.

She says that this is one of those mistakes that businesses are making.

B2B businesses they’re avoid new content types like video.

She says, “Does you businessonly post 1-sentence status updates to your social media channels or link to curated content?You may not have experience creating live videos, presentations, or Buzzfeed-style articles,so you use this as an excuse not to try your hand at these tactics, but adding them toyou toolkit can help you engage more of your audience on social media”.

Chris: It’s all about engagements.

Chuck: At the end of the day you cannot bescared to try something new.

Facebook live video if you haven’t tried it yet, shameon you.

Chris: Try it.

Yeah.

Chuck: Try it, you just have to try it becausethat’s the only way and then you get addicted to it.

You find yourself kind of like my wife,going live for everything.

She’s kind of live and we would be walking, oh hold on heeey.

Chris: We’re live, we’re walking! You’relike– Chuck: Look we were on vacation, we come–was in a– where was we at? Atlanta? Yeah, we’re in Atlanta.

Chris: Right.

Chuck: No, we weren’t in Atlanta, we werein New Orleans.

Chris: Right.

Chuck: We were in New Orleans and– Chris: That’s a good place to live streamprobably.

Chuck: Well it is until– Chris: It’s not.

Chuck: Until you’re walking back to thehotel room.

So she was like we’re walking back in the room and so I’m not going toso– you’re just going to keep the live going now, you know.

She’s like, oh yeah.

Alright.

You know, and so– Chris: There is a time to turn it off.

Chuck: It’s definitely the time to turnit off.

But the point is, embrace those things, like take advantage of them and then the goodnews is you can try it.

You don’t have to keep using it.

Right, if it doesn’t workfor you then– or you don’t have the resources to manage it you don’t have to stick withit, but definitely try it because you don’t know what could happen if you don’t.

Bythe way that’s another good reason to work with an agency.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Because usually we’ll have some resources,some content and some other ways to implement some things a lot faster that you may nothave time to do.

Chris: Number Five! Chuck: Number 5, “No Paying to Play”.

Great one, she says, “6 Huge B2B social Media Marketing Mistakes to avoid”.

Chris: And that one got bigger recently.

Chuck: I’m trying to tell you, not payingto play.

Look you got to put your money up, at the end of the day.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: She says, “To reach both,” keywordboth, “your existing fans and followers and new audiences within your target market,you need to invest in advertising or sponsored content on a variety of social media sites”.

She’s right.

So when you consider like a sponsored Facebook post or something likethat you get the option to tag people who’ve liked you.

Chris: Right.

Chuck: Right, or friends who’ve liked youand their friends.

Right, and that’s about as much as you can do but once you begin toadd budget, once you begin to go paid, then you could begin to target other interests.

And people who fit that same demographical may not be friends of yours who may not haveliked your company but you can still put your adds in front of them.

You don’t get thatoption with a regular post, you only get that option with– Chris &Chuck: A paid post.

Chuck: And so you have to do that and youmust follow suit with whoever it is, whether it’s a sponsored post or a boosted postor a sponsored tweet, a sponsored Snapchat story, a sponsored Instagram post, you haveto pay to do these things and the key here, another pro tip: Turn your blog titles, turnyour content titles and things like that into memes, alright? Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: And then that way when you do thissponsored Instagram post or this sponsored tweet, this meme has a higher opportunityfor engagement, but more importantly it references the content that’s linked to your site.

Take advantage of it.

If you’re going to pay for it, maximize it.

Don’t just payfor it and get good numbers, right.

That’s what we see a lot of people say I boostedthis post and great.

Chris: It looks like good numbers.

Chuck: And it looks like– it– you know,it reached 3000 people.

Chris: Not surprising.

Chuck: Yeah, not surprising but the engagementwas low.

And because maybe the copy wasn’t right– Chris: Long post.

Chuck: The image wasn’t right.

They targetedthe wrong demographic.

So you have to understand those things and then pay for it.

Chris: So, Pro tip: Our classic “Don’tthrow money against the wall and see if it sticks”.

Have some idea of what you’regoing to spend, what’s the goal and are you going– you know track anything to accomplishthat goal.

Chuck: And track it.

Chris: If it’s sign ups for white paper,if it’s people giving you a phone call just make sure you’re tracking it.

Chuck: Number 6.

Chris: Six! Chuck: It’s the last one of her “6 HugeB2B Social Media Marketing Mistakes to Avoid”.

Number 6 she says, “Keeping your SocialMedia Separate form SEO”.

Thank you Tamara for that one.

This is something I’ve beenpreaching about to people for six years now.

Look, social media and SEO just go together.

They just do.

At the end of the day either you’re going to pay an agency to do it oryou’re going to do it yourself, but either way it goes you have to get it done.

And itwill directly affect your SEO.

Matter of fact she said, “Interested prospectsmay find and check out your social media pages and company profiles and more when researchingyour company, so it’s important that they are up to date and portray a positive viewof your business”.

She’s right in that and not only should your social profiles beup to date but [00:30:31] [Indiscernible] in reverse of that your website should beup to date.

And so all that information that’s on your social, like your bio, and your logo,and your tag line, and all of that, that information should be consistent on your website.

So thenthat way when people do leave your website and hit your social channels to kind of, dotheir due diligence and some background, they’re getting a consistent message.

They send aconsistent branding, they’re getting a consistent look and feel of your company.

The problemarises when you’re doing research and then the company looks good and then you go tothat Twitter profile and you see– Chris: Old branding.

Chuck: Old branding, or the last post wastwo years ago and they got like, you know, no– a whole bunch of– they’re followinga whole bunch of people but no followers and two posts.

Chris: All back to front.

Chuck: Man, you just lost all credibilityat that point.

Chris: Yeah.

Chuck: Make sure your social profiles areactive and up date and consistent with whats on your website.

Yeah, punch in the face toyou Tamara.

Chris: Yeah, PITF, PITF.

Chuck: Great article man, “6 Huge B2B SocialMarketing Mistakes to Avoid”.

I can dig it.

Chris: We hit her up and we’re just now–I tweeted.

The funny thing is that I tweeted it and set it down and I was expecting yourwatch to ring, and i never heard it ring.

Chuck: And you never tweeted.

Chris: Yeah, I had one extra character whichwas weird because when I deleted one character, I had six left.

I don’t know, some odd thing.

I’m sure it was user error, that’s just what it usually is.

Chuck: Yeah, it probably was, I’d bet moneyon that.

Chris: Do we have any What News? Chuck: No What News.

Chris: No What News.

Anything to wrap us up?From your side? Chuck: No.

Chris: Alright.

So, if– first off, if youliked this podcast, if you’ve listened to it before or this is your first time and youliked this podcast, we’re going to ask you to do something really simple for us to helpus out.

We really appreciate it.

What we’d like you to do is just invite three otherpeople, three people that you know to listen to our podcast.

Either listen or tune in,either way– Chuck: Yeah, they can watch live, they cantune in later, they could go download it, but just share or shiko– Excuse me– ourpodcast with three people.

Share, tweet it to them.

Post it on their page.

Chris: Send them an email.

Chuck: Tag them in it, email it to them.

Nomatter how you do it, but three people right now.

Chris: One thing that you– and we’ll wait,let me not distract– [00:32:44] [Indiscernible can’t quite hear] Alright, thank you.

Chuck: Appreciate it.

Chris: Also what you can do, and this wouldbe really nice, is if you’ve got a blog, just mention us in your blog and link backto us.

That would be, you know– Chuck: You can even do those three peoplein the same tweet.

I’m not looking for three separate tweets, you can go, you know: Hey,@SuchAndSuch, @Friend2 and @Friend 3, check out #SEOpodcast.

Those guys are awesome.

”That’s a great tweet for somebody who’s surely listening right there.

Chris: Punch in the face to you for doingthat.

Hey, if you’re looking to grow your business with the largest simplest marketingtool on the planet– Chuck: The internet.

Chris: Call eWebResults for increased revenuein your business.

Our phone number is 713-592-6724.

If you have a referral, so it’s very importantfor you to understand, we do websites– Chuck: Yeah we do websites like full-fledged,customized– Chris: Start to finish.

Chuck: Start to finish mobile friendly, webuild on WordPress– Chris: Responsive.

Chuck: Responsive website design.

Chris: We do that.

Chuck: We do that.

Chris: That’s like step 1.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: And then we do social media marketing,search engine optimization, pay-per-click marketing– Chuck: email marketing.

Chris: Al sorts of platforms.

We do all ofthat.

If you have somebody who needs that service, you send them to us, they pay theirbill, we pay you.

We do have a good referral program in place.

If you are in Houston Texason any Thursday, make sure you check out UpSocialNetwork it is the coolest, most cutting edge– Chuck: It is the most dynamic, the most futuristicsocial networking, business networking, all combined in one.

Take advantage.

Chris: UpSocialNetwork I’m leasing yourpotential in your social network.

Go to UpSocialNetwork.

Com and make sure you join us at the next event.

Chuck: Take advantage.

Chris: Yeah, it’s pretty, pretty cool.

Andremember we are filmed live here in Houston, 5999, West 34th Street, Suite 106, Houston,Texas, 77092.

You can get the transcript, the audio and video of our podcast at ourwebsite eWebResults.

Com.

We are the most popular internet marketing podcast on iTunes.

Thatis because of you all.

All of you all.

We’re pointing at you Facebook, you YouTube, andwe’re even pointing at you the podcast listener.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: Now.

Chuck: It’s like a virtual point listener.

Chris: Thank you for making us the most popularpodcast in iTunes.

Chuck: Appreciate it.

Chris: Very much, until next time, my nameis Chris Burres.

Chuck: Charles Lewis.

Chris: Bye bye for now.

Source: Youtube

5 Content Marketing Goals You Should Have – Best SEO Podcast 324

2016-06-03 Podcast 324 Chris: Hi and welcome to the SEO Podcast UnknownSecrets of Internet Marketing.

My name is Chris Burres, owner of eWebResults.

Chuck: I am Charles Lewis, your Client ResultsAdvocate.

Chris: Welcome back to another fun-fillededition of our podcast.

This is podcast number — Chris & Chuck: 324.

Chuck: That's like 324.

Chris: 324.

We're excited that you have come and are joiningus for this podcast.

As always, we do have a tip from the podcastlast week, and our tip is target small niche publications for larger local impact.

Chuck: Look, those smaller niche publications,like your county paper or the local paper for your school or what-not, get in thosebecause that's the biggest way to impact your local community.

Chris: Make sure you have links on those sites.

Chuck: Exactly! Chris: Alright.

As always, please remember, we are filmedlive here in Houston, Texas, and Chuck and I, we are your friendly local neighborhood,– Chris & Chuck: Top Position Snatchers! Chris: And our mantra is — Chuck: Do not be a douche.

Chris: Don't be a douche, it is not a goodlook.

Chuck: Not at all.

Chris: We're talking about content marketinggoals.

Chuck: Contact marketing goals.

Yeah man! Quick punch in the face to the man, Aaron.

This is our second article from Aaron.

Aaron Agius, we caught him again late lastyear.

He posted this article, "Content MarketingGoals That You Should Have", he actually posted this today.

So we'll dig in and see what he's talkingabout.

Chris: Boom! That's us, that's the SEO Podcast UnknownSecrets of Internet Marketing, on top of the latest information, it came out today.

Hey, we would really appreciate it if you.

Wait, let me think, we're good.

Chuck: Yeah, we are.

I followed so many people.

I knew I followed at least 25 people backthis morning.

Chris: Yeah, we're good.

The biggest social platform was our best SEOPodcast Twitter page, had 27 new likes, so we exceeded our 10, and we got a review, itcame in at the last minute.

Chuck: Yeah, it came in yesterday.

Chris: I was like Chuck please, I'm aboutto get that tattoo.

Chuck: And I was like wait.

Chris: Don't! You heard the buzzer, right? You're like "turn it off, cut the power.

" So we got that review.

What that means is we don't tell you how toleave us a review this week.

If we get at least 10 shikos.

What are shikos? Chuck: Shares, likes and follows.

Chris: On any one of our platforms next weekand a review, then we don't go through that process.

Chuck: Tell you how to review us, yeah.

Chris: We will tell you how to connect withus on social media platforms, and you can do that like, I don't know, Facebook.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: Instagram.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: Twitter.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: YouTube.

Com/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: LinkedIn.

Com/company/– Chuck: eWebResults Chris: All of those will take you to our socialmedia page.

Chuck: Profiles, and act accordingly, right? If you're on twitter, follow us.

If you're on Facebook, like us.

What else is there? Chris: There's Instagram where you follow.

Chuck: There's Instagram, double tap us, andfollow us, yeah, like it.

Matter of fact, on IG, you can actually dothe full shiko.

IG and Facebook are really the only 2 placesyou can do the full shiko.

Oh no, you can actually do that on Twittertoo.

Chris: Share, like and follow.

Chuck: Yeah.

Chris: Facebook? Chuck: Yeah, Facebook, you can do all 3 ofthem, definitely.

Chris: Alright.

So if you're a PHP genius or a WordPress guru,we're probably looking for you.

Chuck: Hit us up.

Chris: Go ahead and give us a call, leavean audio résumé, 713-510-7846.

Chuck: I just felt like I should be sign languagingthat number.

Chris: Yeah, you've got to be faster.

I think you just did.

Tune in, check it out.

Actually, watch the video and you can seeChuck sign language.

Chuck: Don't be offended, we dropped a disclaimer,because that may not have been the phone number at all.

Chris: Is this really how you do 1? Chuck: Yeah, I don't know what that said.

Matter of fact, I wasn't even trying to dothat.

Don't listen to him, don't come back and lookat that.

Chris: Yeah.

Don't check that part up.

Or close your eye, sensor it yourself.

If you are interested in a comprehensive websiteanalysis for you or one of your clients, go ahead and get to our website, eWebResults.

Com.

Click the green button, fill that out andwe'll get in contact with you to get your free comprehensive website analysis completed.

And we debated Algo Cat.

What side did we fall on? Chuck: Yeah, we had some interesting Cat.

I think it's worth bringing, they said it'sgoing to come out reportedly a little later.

Chris: Alright.

We'll do small Algo Cat.

Chuck: It's probably 1.

Somthign, it's a tremor,Algo Tremor.

Chris: But it is the announcement of a legitimateAlgorithm Cataclysm.

Chuck: Tremors usually come before, right? Chris: Yeah.

So time for the favorite segment of the program,– Chris & Chuck: The Algorithm Cataclysm, pffttt.

Chris: Yeah, I'll just give it a wobble.

Chuck: Yeah, a little wobbly little tremor.

So basically, what happens is Google cameout, released a statement that they are about to change their ranking factor specificallyfor mobile pages and how your mobile ranking works.

So what that really means is if your siteloads fast and your mobile version is not the best speed experience, your pages areslower, you might want to take the next couple of months and fix that because they're goingto turn up dial on that specific part of the ranking algorithm, the mobile speed test.

So you want to make sure that your sites areloading really, really fast and these mobile users are having a great experience becausethat is going to become more important in regards to how Google is ranking your site.

Chris: Moving forward.

Chuck: Definitely.

Chris: So Chuck, how do I know what my mobilespeed is? Chuck: So they released a test, they alreadyhad the page speed test which you can go to, and it's like you can find it in search consoleand you can find it on the webmaster blog, and a couple of other places.

But they released a new one that's like thinkwith Google, checkmywebsite.

ThinkwithGoogle.

Com, and testmywebsite.

ThinkwithGoogle.

Com.

Go there.

It's kind of a cool long poise layout.

Chris: It's the same test I think.

Chuck: It's driven by the page speed test,they just formatted it a little differently.

It's pretty cool.

So here is my kick in the shin, since we'retalking about it.

Chris: To Google.

Chuck: To Google.

It literally said that great, 100%, all greenchecks for mobile friendliness, and then it gave it [00:05:57] [Indiscernible] for mobilespeed.

Chris: Isn't speed part of being friendly? Chuck: Yeah.

So I'm going to advice that you guys changefriendliness to maybe usability, because I think that's probably what you were gradingus on.

Chris: Mobile ease of use.

Chuck: Yeah, and then that way, your new pagespeed test may be a little bit more easy to understand.

Chris: Yeah.

Because I think you would even argue thatslow is not friendly.

Chuck: Yeah, exactly.

Chris: So I got just 2 pieces of news.

I just thought this was interesting.

Uber got an investment of $3.

5 billion froma Saudi company.

Chuck: Yeah, I saw that.

Chris: I heard it on the radio first and theysay it may be that Uber is kind of gathering as much private funds as they can, tryingto avoid going public, and while the funds are available, that there are some concernthat private funds might be less available later.

Chuck: Well, you know with Uber, they alreadygot so much hate.

Like I had a great Facebook debate with mybrother-in-law, probably 2 weeks ago.

He was saying that he hated Uber, he willnever use it, he didn't understand why people do it.

And then I was like, well, — Chris: Have you tried it? Chuck: Bro, on the other hand, I love it,I use it everything I travel, F-cabs, like I use Uber, you know what I'm saying? Like this is what I'm doing.

So here's why, I don't have to pull out nopaperwork and I don't have to pay nothing right at the end.

Chris: I don't need a receipt.

Chuck: I don't need none of that.

Chris: I can even actually have a differentprofile where some stuff is billed to the company and some stuff is private.

Chuck: Exactly, you've got tons of benefit.

So I feel like Uber doing stuff like thatis because yellow cab companies and all these other people are suffering, public transportationis suffering, and at a rapid rate.

So they're trying to get their chips up becausethey're probably — Chris:.

Are going to need them.

Chuck: Have a long line of lawsuits.

Chris: To play a long game of poker.

Chuck: Exactly.

Chris: Do you realize we just raised $2.

5billion, so your lawyers don't scare us.

Chuck: Exactly.

Chris: Could take away a lot of the scaretactics and victories that could be won just because we got the double-breasted suit.

Chuck: Just because we got the treasure chestback here.

Chris: Alright.

And then I thought this was cool, I thinkwe even spoke about this or something, but Samsung has cordless ear buds, so they'reBluetooth and powered.

Powered, no big deal, but they're Bluetooth,and they don't have a cord between them.

Chuck: So it's like literally 2 small buds.

Chris: It's 2 separate buds in each ear thathave chargers and are individually Bluetooth.

Chuck: I'm going to lose them.

Chris: "Hey, I lost my stereo, what happened.

" Chuck: People will be jogging with them.

Chris: And right in the sewer, yeah.

Look at that.

It's kind of cool if they don't fall off.

Chuck: It's awesome.

You're sitting at the desk, it's cool.

Chris: Although it is a lot harder to pull,like you've got to get in there and grab it to pull it out.

If someone's like "hey Chuck", you're like"hold on, doing a little minor surgery.

" Chuck: Probably looks like.

what word? People who are hard to hearing.

Chris: Like a hearing aid.

Chuck: Yeah, it looks like a hearing aid situation.

It's really my beats.

Chris: I can hear you, let me take that out.

So I just thought that was cool.

Chuck: Take out my hearing aid to hear you.

Chris: Do you have any news before I get intoour reviews.

Chuck: I do have a little bit of news.

So a couple podcasts ago, we talked aboutGoogle Assistant, and Google Assistant is the new kind of voice assistant competitorto like Siri and the Windows Cortana situation.

So Google wanted to take it a step further.

Chris: Amazon Alexa is the other one.

Chuck: Yeah.

They want Google Assistant to be given a personalityand a back story.

Google actually brought on Emma Coats fromPixar, and she's on the team, and this was her quote.

She said "because it's out in the wild andpeople can say anything to it, we have to create the most well-rounded character thatwe have ever tried.

One of the things we're working on is howto make it relatable, how does this character think of itself in a way that you can relateto? What's its childhood.

I think it's an awesome idea.

Chris: Yeah, absolutely.

Chuck: At the same time, I think it's kindof farfetched because there is no way possible you're going to be able to create one personalityfor everybody, it just ain't going to happen.

Chris: It's going to irritate.

Chuck: It's going to irritate somebody.

Chris: So maybe that is because we were debating,like Siri is kind of mechanical.

Chuck: Maybe that's why.

Chris: So as soon as you give it a back story,it's going to irritate somebody.

Chuck: Whoever the back story doesn't fitin with.

Chris: I think the lady who speaks to me andwaves is actually flirting with me, "turn right", what! Chuck: So my suggestion for you guys, EmmaCoats and those who are on this team working on Google Assistant, go ahead and put someof that treasure chest of you guys' behind it, some resources behind it, and give usthe option to tag our own personality details.

So that way, I may want to check mine as urban,speak slang.

Chris: Southern urban.

Chuck: Southern urban, exactly.

And uses Houston lingo.

So it says exit loop, I don't know.

Chris: 69, they changed the freeway on us.

Or apparently, they didn't change it.

Chuck: It's always been that.

Chris: They changed what they called it.

Chuck: Whatever.

I'd rather mine just say get on the southwest freeway.

So take that into consideration.

If you can let us customize the features ofit and the personality, I think your usage will skyrocket.

Chris: Yeah, very cool.

Chuck: That's my news, Chris: Alright, so here is the review thatwe got.

The title of the review is simply stellarand it is of course, — Chris & Chuck: 5 stars! Chris: This is by Majones Media [Phonetic]from United States, and it says "as a seasoned web designer with a growing interest in digitalstrategy.

" Chuck: More and more people we're coming intoare like this.

Our story is about the dividing line betweenthe 2, the designer and then the person who does the marketing.

Chris: Yeah.

So now, a lot of designers understand, theyneed to at least have a lot of good background about digital strategy.

"So growing interest in digital strategy,I can say that this podcast really delivers.

Chris and Charles put out extremely relevantcontent on a consistent basis and do so in an entertaining way that keeps their audiencecaptivated for the entire episode.

Thank you Chris and Charles for breathinglife into a topic that's so critical to any organization with an online presence.

The knowledge I'm able to pass along to myclients because of your podcast is priceless.

" Wow! That's awesome.

Chuck: Keyline she said here, she said "entireepisode", that's like meat and potatoes.

Chris: Yeah, thank you.

That's a smack in the face.

Chuck: Yeah, shots fired.

Chris: You did that it in your MC PPC.

Chuck: Saw that? Chris: Yeah, it was good.

The slaughter, we'll call it slaughter.

It wasn't a rap battle, it was a rap slaughter.

Awesome.

Majonas Media [Phonetic] punch in the faceto you, thank you so much.

I do actually have a PITF, this one goes toBrian Harris, he's with ourgulfshoresvacation.

Com, had a great conversation with him this weekabout what he's trying to do with his business, and it's awesome, it's great to talk to businessowners who are on top of what they're doing.

He recognizes the value of reviews, and wehad an interesting conversation about a review challenge they had recently and how he handledit ultimately so well.

And then my advice to him was well, you dida great job handling it, it looks like you need to do a better job getting that informationout there, that you handled it right.

Chuck: So people can see how it was handled.

Chris: There were a couple of 1 stars whocame from people, it was a kind of sad case, right? It eneded up getting a couple of 1 stars becausepeople just read the story and were like "come on, give me my money back", and he did, butthen, didn't go back and comment to those people, right? So they had nothing.

Chuck: Man, the follow up is so importantin regards to reviews.

It's like positive or negative or neutralfeedback.

All feedback requires the follow-up.

Chris: Even from the owner, "we remember thissituation, it was significantly more complicated than is presented here.

We've already made contact with them, thankyou.

" That's better than silence.

Chuck: Did nothing.

Because silence means you don't care, evenif you did solve it and fix it.

Chris: We had our own client talking aboutdriving in Austin, and I just love this quote, I just decided to write it down and bringit in here.

It says "driving 5 minutes in Austin, it mightas well be in Egypt.

" Talking about a music class that's here or5 minutes down the road, yeah, that music class might as well be in Egypt.

Chuck: It's the same thing in Houston, especiallyright now with all this rain.

I left the house at 8 o' clock this morning,I didn't get here till 9:45.

Chris: There is no 5 minute drive anymore.

Punch in the face to Brian with the Lone StarSchool of Music man.

Chuck: Punch in the face to him man! Chris: One of our favorite client by far.

Chuck: Yeah.

So let's get into this content man.

Like I said, punch in the face to Aaron Agius,and the good folks over at Search Engine Journal.

He posted this article, "Content MarketingGoals That You Should Have'.

We all talk about content marketing a lotand all of your activities should have some sort of goal in mind.

So let's see what goals he said we shouldhave.

He starts off by saying "without well-definedgoals, the content you’re producing is little more than noise, and not going to satisfythe needs of your customers", and he's exactly right.

Like you need to have some direction for thecontent, have some focus for the content, have an objective for your content, what isthis content for, why are you writing this, who are you targeting, what are you goingto do with it? Make sure you have that understanding beforeyou start writing this content, before you start doing your marketing.

Why? So you can set up the right goals.

Those goals may be, I don't know, trafficwhich we'll get into, it could be developing brand awareness which we'll get into first.

But the key is understanding what those goalsare prior to developing this content.

So when you do develop it, you can be on theright path to promote it and get the desired action you want.

So with that, he says number 1.

Chris: 1.

Chuck: Developing brand awareness.

He goes on to say that quality, authoritativecontent showcases the expertise of your company, and leaves the audience asking, “who madethis?", he's absolutely correct.

That's what quality content does.

Matter of fact, this is really what drivesSuper Bowl commercials for example.

They want content that's memorable, they wantcontent that people may not even remember the product, but they remember the name, right? That's the importance of brand-focused content.

The goal is making them remember you whenit's time to spend.

They're like "oh, remember such and such?" They remembered your brand, and how they rememberedyour brand is the key.

It could have been the color skin that joggedtheir memory, it could have been a funny quote in the video, it could have been a funny Facebookvideo they saw, it could have been the tone that your content was written it, all of thataffects your branding.

The key is making that branding stand outin that content so they can remember you.

He goes on to say some examples of relevantcontent for the sake of branding could be funny or entertaining videos or eBooks, webinars.

Chris: [00:17:04] [Indiscernible] Chuck: Exactly.

Infographics, SlideShare desk and things likethat.

All of these are valuable pieces of contentthat you use to market your specific brand.

Yeah, branding is important.

Number 2.

Chris: 2.

Chuck: He says driving traffic to a website.

And again, he's talking about goals for yourcontent.

Second goal is to drive traffic to your website.

He goes on to say you're creating contentwith the intent to drive people to your site, nurture the relationship with valuable contentand warm the lead towards the end of the sales funnel.

And he's right.

Again, we do all of this stuff online to getpeople back to the side.

It's something I preach every quarter in myquarterly internet marketing class with the University of Houston, it's something we preachhere on every podcast, that the website is the foundation of all your internet marketing.

Chris: It's the hub.

Chuck: It's the hub, it's home based, thisis where the conversion happens, this is where your cart is, this is where your email sign-upis, this is where your remarketing code is, this is where everything happens on the site.

So the whole purpose of your content marketingis to drive traffic to the site.

Chris: Absolutely.

Chuck: Exactly.

So that's what I said.

All the stuff is there, your social linksare even there.

Matter of fact, and he gave some examples.

Some examples of content to help drive trafficcould be social media content that links back to your website, or videos.

Chris: I just did one right now.

Chuck: Yeah, I saw that.

Chris: It's a tweet that went out, it sayswatch us talk about — Chuck:.

This, with a link here.

Chris: Right, like goals that you should havefor your content, watch it live right now on our website.

Chuck: Exactly.

It could be videos that push relevant trafficto a certain landing page or even blog articles with a certain call to action that move readersto take a certain action.

The key is making sure that the content thatyou're putting out actually gets people to the website.

We want to get people there because that'swhere your conversion happens.

Chris: The video is an interesting one becausewe've dealt with so many clients, even video savvy clients who can't figure out how toget a link or an annotation on their video that links back to their site.

Take the time and figure it out.

You can Google it and figure it out, hireus, we'll do it.

Chuck: It's really simple, it's a very tediousprocess.

Chris: Yeah, you've got to go through a bunchof little steps.

Chuck: But it's not hard, it's not hard atall and it's definitely worth doing because it has value.

I've seen it, I've taken a step and even taggedthose links with a certain URL [00:19:24] [Indiscernible] code just so we can look atit later and see that depending on how engaging the video is, then you'll likely get thoseclicks back.

Number 3.

Chris: 3.

Chuck: He says generating sales leads.

And again, we're talking about the goals foryour content marketing.

He says you want to convert that blog andwebsite traffic into leads that you then begin to nurture as part of your sale cycle, andhe's right.

And this kind of goes back to really yoursite design and your usability.

Really, at the end of the day, now that you'vegotten them to the site, you need to write elements in place to drive them to your salesfunnel, you need the right call to action, you need the right blend of text and images,you need the right contact form in the right position with the right button at the rightcolor for that matter.

You need all of these elements.

You need a mobile-friendly layout that allowsease of use on a mobile device, you need all of these things on your site, functionalityon your site.

Because after you've done the branding, afteryou've driven that traffic and you finally got them to the site, you have to have theseelements in place in order to turn them to leads, because if not, then they may absorbthat content, and then they'll likely bounce, or they'll leave or they won't become a lead.

And at the end of the day, you want them tobecome a lead.

Chris: We call that CMVO.

Chuck: CMVO, exactly.

Chris: Content Marketing Visitor Optimization.

Chuck: He even gave a few examples of thattype of content and that will be like eBooks and case studies or demos for your productsand things like that.

So dig this, somebody searches, they found,they landed on your great blog post, and now they're on your site and they read a blogpost about I don't know, ductless AC units and why you need to have one this summer.

And after they read that post, now what? You don't want to just leave them, you wantto give them an action, you want them to maybe sign up on our newsletter and get 10% offyour next ductless install or watch this video on how you can do a ductless install yourself,or something like that.

You want your content to keep nurturing thatlead to the point where they contact you.

Chris: Or have them give their email informationto get the video on how to do it by themselves.

Chuck: To get the video, exactly, it's important,you've just got to have it.

Number 4.

Chris: 4.

Chuck: He says converting leads into customers,right? So number 1 was branding, number 2 was getthe traffic, number 3 was generate leads, number 4 is converting those leads into customers.

He says you're nurturing that lead in hopesof closing the deal and making a sale.

And at the end of the day, that's what we'reall doing.

Whether it's an e-commerce sale, whether it'sa product download, whether it's a newsletter subscribe, whatever the conversion was, whateverour sale is, that's what we want them to do.

Chris: The value happens at the sale.

Chuck: Exactly.

He says now that we're on the site, what typeof content will help them take that next step, right? If you're an e-commerce site, what's goingto make them buy? I don't know, maybe a video supporting theproduct, explaining how to use it, maybe showing it in use, maybe you're a service provider.

Chris: Maybe a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

Chuck: Satisfaction guarantees, some freeshipping.

These are some stuff that's kind of standardthese days.

Like new e-commerce site? Yeah, you should have free shipping, you justshould, you should have a warrantee, you should, right? And maybe you're a service provider, thenmaybe what is going to take for them, maybe it's a case study, maybe it's a video testimonialfrom a previous client of yours that can help convert that lead into a customer.

He even gave some examples of the type ofcontent that does that, trials and demonstration videos, case studies, or even, he put eye-catchingads for like remarketing campaigns.

Those do a great job of converting leads intocustomers, especially after they've messed around and left your site.

Number 5.

Chris: Number 5.

Chuck: This is the last one.

He says improving retention and driving upsells.

Chris: So this is interesting.

I've just got to throw this out there becausewhen I first saw the title of it, you know, goals for content marketing, you think ofcontent marketing really kind of synonymous with inbound marketing, and it is, and yourfirst thought is okay, I've got this content that's out there that's bringing people tomy site, but this makes the very valuable point that content marketing doesn't stopjust because they came to your site.

It continues to like okay, so now I want themto become a lead, now I want that lead to become a customer, now I want that customerto become a customer who spends more money.

Chuck: Yeah, I want this customer to becomea referral source now, right? Chris: Absolutely.

Chuck: Now I want to keep engaging them, sothe point is improving retention is what Chris is talking about and driving upsells.

He says once the customer is yours, the contentmarketing shouldn't end.

This is the stage where you're creating customcontent specific to your existing customers in order to turn, nurture those relationshipsand keep them coming back for more.

This is an awesome point, and frankly, it'sprobably missed by most companies.

Like you have to keep your clients engaged,especially when you have other product and services they can use.

So maybe you're an AC company and you justsold a $10,000 replacement AC system.

Chris: Maintenance contract.

Chuck: Great.

You sold that system, now what? You put them on a maintenance contract.

Or maybe you also sell an air scrubber andyou recognize that this client has the allergies, that's a great upsell for them.

And maybe down the line, you realize theyhave a family, okay, maybe a Nest thermostat or some other type of programmable thermostatmay be another upsell for them.

The key is keep pushing content their waythat's specific to them that can help upsell your other services, that can help retainthem as business.

At the end of the day, what we've kind oflearned also is that once somebody is paying you, like they're already a client, it's easierto get them to pay you more, versus getting a new client.

Chris: Getting a new one to pay you some.

Chuck: Exactly, it just works that way.

So he even gave some examples of this typeof content, and that's like exclusive offers and deals, maybe sent through an email marketingcampaign.

Chris: Membership.

Chuck: Exactly.

Membership clubs, video tutorials for a newproduct, or even free or exclusive content for customers only.

That type of stuff.

Because at the end of the day, you have todo that, you're going to use content to get traffic, get leads, you want to nurture andconvert them, more importantly, you want to resell them later.

Chris: Got a pro-tip, and you actually mentionedit.

Really should be number 6.

Chuck: Hold on, I wrote pro-tip on here, Iprobably skipped over it.

No, I'm going to see what yours is beforeI say it.

Chris: So this number 6, because it legitimatelyis number 6, you've got them as a customer, you've got them on repeat content marketingcampaigns, now get them to become a referral source.

Chuck: Exactly.

Chris: A raving fan.

So keep that content out there, keep thatcustomer appreciation going out to that customer, and turn them in, let them know how your referralprogram works.

Chuck: Incentivize it.

Chris: Yeah, that's number 6.

Chuck: So here's my pro-tip, when we're talkingabout converting leads to customers, develop CTAs that are based on the type of content,right? So if this person comes from a search for,what's my example on ductless AC, and then they land on article that talks about thegreat Mitsubishi electric ductless ACs that M.

E.

Flow offers, then when they get to thatpage, they should see a CTA that says "install your ductless AC unit.

" So that way, the action that you're askingthem to take is consistent with what they searched and the content they read.

Continuity goes a long way in regards to contentmarketing.

Man, punch in the face to you man, Aaron Agius,"Content Marketing Goals You Should Have", this was on Search Engine Journal, great articledude.

Chris: We should hit him up and tell him aboutnumber 6.

Chuck: Yeah, I'll hit him up.

Chris: It's literally in the line of kindof standard customer progression.

Chuck: Will do that.

Chris: Very cool.

We've got any "what" news? Chuck: No, I have no "what" news.

Chris: I kind of have.

I know you're a sports guy.

I watched like 2 games 2 weeks ago.

So Golden State got through.

Chuck: Yeah, they came back.

Chris: Like they were behind 3-1 and theycame back.

Wow! Chuck: Dude, Golden State, I hope they winit all.

And the way they played yesterday, they probablywill.

Chris: Wow! And that will be 2 years in a row.

Chuck: Yeah.

I just want them to win it because this yearalone, they broke so many records.

They had the best record ever, right? Bulls had it for the longest 72 and 10, GoldenState beat that this year, 73 and 9, Steph Curry broke the 3 point record, 402 3's in1 year.

He was the unanimous MVP, that's the firsttime that's ever been done.

Chris: Wow! Chuck: So I'm like go ahead and get MVP andthe finals and get a championship too.

Why not! You know what I'm saying? You deserve it.

Chris: You deserve it, yeah, very cool.

So hey, if you're looking to grow your businessusing the largest, simplest marketing tool on the planet.

Chuck: The internet.

Chris: Go ahead and give us a call, we areeWebResults.

You can reach us at 713-592-6724.

What we do is help generate more business,more revenue for businesses.

Chuck: Yeah, using digital marketing.

Chris: If you've got a referral, so that'syour customer looking to take advantage of internet marketing, and we mean internet marketing,website design, social media efforts.

Chuck: SEO, pay per click email marketing,you name it.

Chris: All the great drip campaigns contentmarketing we're talking about here.

Go ahead and send that referral to us.

When they pay their bill, we will pay you.

We are filmed live at 5999, West 34th Street,Suite 106, Houston, Texas, 77092.

You all have made us the most popular internetmarketing podcast on iTunes.

Because of that, we've made our podcast available.

Chuck: Yeah, in multiple different ways.

Chris: Video and audio can be downloaded,and you can get actually the transcript from our website eWebResults.

Com.

Again, thank you all.

Chuck: You know the form of content marketingby the way.

Chris: Thank you all for making us the mostpopular internet marketing podcast on iTunes.

We're actually switching over to SoundCloud,so any feedback we can get on SoundCloud.

Chuck: Yeah, let us know people, who listento podcasts right now.

And I'm talking to you listeners specificallybecause you don't watch SoundCloud, you listen to SoundCloud.

So anybody who's listening right now, whomaybe listening to other podcasts on the SoundCloud platform or any other platform for that matter,man, hit us up, let us know what you like, what you don't like and what you expect.

Chris: Send us an email, podcast@– Chuck: eWebResults.

Com.

Chris: Yeah.

And then we'll kind of interact with you.

We already noticed one thing on SoundCloud,the pictures don't come across the same.

Chuck: Yeah, the pictures kind of suck.

Chris: That may be a setting, we've got tomess with that.

And also, the feeds stopped for a while untilwe realized how to fix that.

Anyway, thanks again to y'all.

My name is Chris Burres with eWebResults.

Chuck: Charles Lewis.

Chris: Bye-bye for now.

Source: Youtube