Tag: techniques?

How can a website compete using only white hat techniques?

>> CUTTS: Today's question comes from SurfVoucherin Costa Rica.

SurfVoucher asks, "How can a website compete for high rankings usingonly white hat techniques in industries that are dominated by spammers if Google takesmonths to react to spam reports and by that time new black hat sites are ranking?" Fantasticquestion and I'll try to get a lot of different information in so hope I get it all.

Firstof, you always want to be making a white hat site, something that stand the test of time.

One of the main things that differentiate a white hat site from a black hat site isthat the black hat sites are typically built to sort of succeed for a few days or a fewweeks, maybe a few months and then fail.

People are not investing long term resources in makinga great site.

So one thing you can bear in mind is that if you're making a white hatsite, follow the sort of techniques that stand the test of time because black hat sites willcome and go but as long as your site keeps rising in terms of visibility and viability.

Eventually, the new black hat sites won't be able to compete with the authority andthe reputation that you've built up.

The other thing to bear in mind is that Google is alwayslooking at how to stop the white hat tricks.

So the metabolism of spammers kicks up asthey try to hack sites or do other nasty malicious stuff.

But then Google tries to respond bywriting hack site classifiers and other ways to sort of stop fresh trends or hot trendspam, things like that.

So Google has been developing new tools to try to make sure thatblack hat spammers don't get to stay around for as long as the white hat sites.

So we'llkeep working on our side.

Don't just get discouraged because it might take a while to see the spamreports take in effect.

Sometimes it takes effect all at once.

Sometimes it can get onour radar.

And I think it's totally fine if you're running a white hat site to blog aboutyour niche and say, "Hey, this niche needs to be cleaned up by Google," or "There's toomany black hats in this area.

Google, pay more attention.

" You know, that's just goodlobbying, you know.

Send me a tweet or something like that to say "Pay more attention to thisarea," because we do take that feedback and we act on it.

The other thing is make surethat you're using techniques that have you know either great research or great resourcesor have something that's viral about it.

You don't just want to produce great information.

You also want to think about "How do I market that? How do I let people know about the greatstuff that I've got?" And if you start to do that, then as your site gets to be knownand people start to go to your site deliberately, not just, you know, go to Google and searchand click on whatever's number one or two or three.

Whenever you get to be known asthe resource in that area, you can build up that viability long term and really do a muchbetter job of competing against the black hats.

One last thing to think about is ifyou got the black hats and they're competing against some super, super crazy spammy searchlike, you know, "Buy Viagra online," or something like that.

You don't have to necessarily attackthem head-on.

You can also think about "Let's start making some informational resources,something that's not quite in this space.

And then as I build up my reputation in anarea that's not quite as spammy, I can move in to this more commercial space over time.

So it's the same sort of–I refer to it as the Katamari technique, where you start outwith a small area and you build and you build and you build, and your resources and yourauthority and your reputation just gets bigger and bigger and bigger.

And if you start outin one of those really contested spaces then it might be harder to compete.

But sometimes,you can start out in an area that's sort of adjacent build up until people know you asa resource and then take on more or move in to an area that's a little more commercial,little more contested, sometimes a little more spammy.

So at Google, we'll always continueto be working to sort of find the black hat spam, make sure that those techniques don'twork as long as you're pursuing the white hat techniques that will sort of stand thetest of time.

Then over the passage of time, your site should be doing better than theblack hat sites.

We'll keep working on our side, and hopefully you'll keep working onyour side.

Source: Youtube

What should I do if my competitors are using webspam techniques?

Today's question comes from HoodRiver, where lisawilliams wants to know, "White hat searchmarketers read and follow Google guidelines.

What should they tell clientswhose competitors use black hat techniques such as doorwaypages and whom continue to rank as a result ofthose techniques?" So first and foremost, I wouldsay do a spam report.

Because if you're violatingGoogle's guidelines in terms of cloaking or sneaky JavaScriptredirects, buying links, doorway pages, keywordstuffing, all those kinds of things, we do wantto know about it.

So you can do a spam report.

That's private.

You can also stop by Google'sWebmaster forum, and that's more public.

But you can do a spamreport there.

You can sort of say, hey,I saw this content.

It seems like it's rankinghigher than it should be ranking.

Here's a real business, and it'sbeing outranked by this spammer, those kindsof things.

There are people who keep aneye on that forum, not just Google employees,but also sort of superusers or bionic posters.

And they can also passthose reports on.

So there are a lot of differentways to report specific incidents of spam.

The other thing that I wouldsay is if you look at the history of which businesseshave done well over time, you'll find the sorts of sitesand the sorts of businesses that are built to standthe test of time.

If someone is using a techniquethat is a gimmick or something that's like the SEOfad of the day, that's a little less likely toreally work well a few years from now.

So a lot of the times, you'llsee people just chasing after, OK, I'm going to use guestbooks, or I'm going to use link wheels or whatever.

And then they find, oh, thatstopped working as well.

And sometimes it's becauseof broad algorithmic changes like Panda.

Sometimes it's because ofspecific web spam targeted algorithms.

But it can also bethe case that we can crack down on even large companies.

If you go back and look at theNew York Times articles about JC Penney or Overstock, we'rewilling to take action on anything that we considerto be a violation of our guidelines.

So my short answer is go aheadand do a spam report.

You can also report it in theforums.

But it's definitely the case that if you're takingthose higher risks, that can come back and bite you.

And that can have amaterial impact.

So I would recommend that peopleavoid going with the black hat techniques.

And we're happy to hear, we'rehappy to get feedback either at conferences, on Twitter,online, blogs, forums, if you're seeing sites that areprospering and are using black hat techniques.

Now, it's possible that theyhave some low-quality links, and there are some links thatpeople aren't aware of that we see that are actuallyhigh quality.

But we're happy toget spam reports.

We're happy to dig into them.

And then we'll try to findeither new algorithms to try to rank the things moreappropriately in the future.

Or we're certainly willing totake manual action on spam if it's egregious or if it violatesour guidelines.

We have a manual web spam teamthat is willing to respond to those spam reports.

So thanks very much.

Source: Youtube